Category Archives: The Artists

Rone Prinz Jewelry

Whimsically humerous clockwork shorebirds with antique watch-part tummies and dangling legs, silver whale flukes on copper seas, winged beetles and shadow-boxed bees adorned with semi-precious stones, sea siren mermaids with moonstone faces, playful flowers in shades of metal, stones softened by the ebb and tide of the sea.  All part of Rone Prinz’ collection of unique wearable art jewelry – Industrial Zen goes natural.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

“I started making jewelry during a Japanese papermaking class in 1986. I tore a piece off one of my sculptures & turned it into a pair of earrings. I saw a universe of beauty in this tiny little fragment that day. Then the alchemy of art began to evolve & one thing led to another. As I keep evolving I am still making jewelry. I am heavily influenced by my surroundings, whether it be driving cross country to an art show or  walking on the beach  watching birds. It’s exciting to see what wants to escape from my hands & form itself into something that is actually wearable.”

“Never limiting myself as far as materials go, I figure everything is a candidate from sterling silver & precious gems to found objects. I especially love repurposing these objects which to me are as precious as a diamond. I use basic metalsmithing & sculpture techniques to fabricate, such as forming, carving, sawing, soldering & sanding.”

We’d love to hear what you have to say about Rone’s work and her process. Leave us a message on our blog, and visit us at Seven Sisters Gallery.

Dawn Valli

Dawn Valli grew up in Tujunga, California within a home overflowing with art. Her father’s love of art stimulated him to achieve an MFA and becoming a full time art teacher. Her mother was also a very vivid artist, expressed herself and experimented in multiple mediums. Dawn, loving every kind of art form, received her BA in Interdisciplinary Studies, then went on to receive an MA in Psychology, and MSS and DSS in Spiritual Science.

DawnValli2015-1

Dawn experiences art as a treasure hunt filled with the discoveries of Divine Imagination and vibrant dream lands that fill her heart and Soul with wonder. Beyond the surface of this life, she perceives depths of Infinite Love and astonishing beauty.

 

As an artist, Dawn initially focused on commissioned portraits in varying paint mediums.

Over the last decade, her lifelong love of photography brought Dawn into the expanding universe of digital art where she has been transcending realism into mystical realism. She exhibited and sold pieces at famed McGroarty Arts Center’s shows, “Just California” (2012) and “Bite Me” (2013).

Her love of touching art is being fulfilled through sculpture. Her figurative sculpture is at times completely realistic, and at other times travels into lands of metaphor. She began exhibiting and selling ceramics annually at McGroarty ceramic shows beginning in 2009. Additionally, she has been expressing through mixed media bas-relief and alto-relievo using painterly skills combined with gel mediums and fiber clays on carved boards with movable elements. She exhibited and sold mixed media pieces of this kind at McGroarty Arts Center Shows, “Art at Play” (2014) and “Earth, Air, Fire, Water” (2015).

See more of Dawn’s work at http://stores.sevensistersgalleryca.com/dawn-valli/

and http://dawnvalli.smugmug.com/Ocean-Adventures/

Trudi Gilliam: Metal Sculpture

trudi_choppyseas2

Trudi Gilliam is an artist who specializes in sculptures and mixed media art. A graduate of James Madison University with a bachelors degree in Fine Art and a concentration in Sculpture, Trudi draws inspiration, for her one-of-a-kind, hand-crafted pieces, from the wild landscapes in which she travels and lives. As an avid fan of the ocean, and to get an even closer perspective of the sea and marine life, Gilliam received her scuba certification while living on St. Croix, where she has spent more than 25 years. Today Trudi shares time between St. Croix, the Central Coast of California, and her home in Montana.

Gilliam makes frequent use of mediums such as copper and sea glass, as well as other metals like brass and silver, using them to create her works of art. Birds, flowers, and nature scenes are often the subject of Gilliam’s creations. One of our favorites is of a local treasure, the Piedras Blancas Lighthouse, which has recently reopened after extensive restoration.

The Piedras Blancas Lighthouse is located at Point Piedras Blancas, meaning “white rocks”. The name is inspired by the large white rocks located slightly off the point, which mariners would use as navigational landmarks. In 1875, a lighthouse was built to further take advantage of the white rocks, which glowed bright when hit with the light from the lighthouse. After 10 months of construction, the 100 foot tall lighthouse was complete.

Throughout the rest of the 1800’s and early 1900’s the lighthouse was in full use, although a handful of earthquakes began to shake the foundation of the lighthouse, and a large earthquake in 1949 forced the removal of the top 3 stories. After the top 3 stories were removed, the lighthouse stood at 70 feet tall.

Restoration is currently taking place, with goals to reconstruct the top 3 stories and return the lighthouse to its original height of 100 feet. Some of the completed restoration projects on the sight include the fog horn building, the water tower, and much painting of the original lighthouse.

In addition, the landscaping has been redone to restore it back to how it was at the time of the lighthouse’s construction. The reintroduction of native plants has also lead to the increase in native animals, such as sea otters, elephant seals, gray whales, and many species of birds.

image

Elizabeth Ngo: Antique Button Jewelry

3BttnDrp

Elizabeth Ngo creates jewelry from historical works of art. Perhaps you yourself own one of these tiny historical pieces, thrown into a jar or the back of a drawer. You might have one or two tucked under your sofa cushion. The button. The simple fastener that fastens material and memories and generations. How many of us remember hours of entertainment sifting through button collections? Enjoying the feel of running our fingers through a pile spilled onto the floor. Marveling at the variety and detail. Turning to our siblings to say, “look at this one!” So often, as I stand with a customer, picking up this piece and that of the Ngo collection, I hear a story tied to memories of our mothers, our grandmothers, our younger selves.

Earrings-01CalandarImage-downsized

The simple button carries a sort of sacred quality that transports us to another time. Elizabeth Ngo retains that quality by creating with great respect and attention to detail. With a profound reverence for the historical significance of each piece, she maintains the integrity of the button by leaving the shank in tack. Setting the buttons in finely worked and beautifully detailed sterling silver to create wonderfully balanced rings, bracelets, necklaces and earrings. Adding details of Swarovski crystals and semi-precious stones and the finest findings.

“I work mostly with the Victorian Glass, picturesque French Metals, carved pearls and hand painted enamel buttons from this period. They are all very unique works of art that speak about their time period. Preserving these buttons into unique pieces of jewelry is my way of putting the buttons back on the women.”

These elegant works of art reflect the era of the 1800’s in Europe. Whimsical characters, fleur de lis imagery, knights and battles, created with amazing enameling and intricate carving. Victorian glass, pearls and shells, ornate rhinestones and iridescent glass, all reflecting a time when art and history and handwork were highly revered. ring

The history of buttons goes back at least as far as the Satsumas, highly collectible ceramic buttons from Japan. Named for a historic ceramics center on the southernmost island of Japan, Satsumas were first made in the 17th century by Korean potters. These buttons were often painted in extraordinary detail, depicting miniature scenes from Japanese life and the natural world.

The brass picture buttons, which you’ll find in the Elizabeth Ngo collection, come from the Victorian era and are also highly collectible. Delightful pieces, stamped with charming images inspired by everything from operas to children’s books. Other picture buttons took their cues from nature (flora and fauna), the sciences (stars and moons), or mythology (cupids and fairies). 22-13-02

22-13-35Black glass buttons from the Victorian era came next. Initially, black buttons were made out of jet, a fossilized coal found near Whitby, England. But because of the high cost of jet, black glass was soon used as a replacement.

Some black glass buttons were molded to create reliefs of plants and animals, and detailed pictorials. Some of the buttons have reliefs of fabrics patterns; others have a stunning silver or iridescent luster. You might also find some that have been painted or enameled.

Explore our cases and join in discovering the stories behind these historical pieces. Once your inner sleuth is awoken, you might check out some of these great online resources to further your adventure:

Hammond Turner & Sons online collection: http://www.hammond-turner.com/

Keep Homestead online collection: http://keephomesteadmuseum.org/button.htm

The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A), London, is the world’s largest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4.5 million objects. They have an online button collection that you can view at: http://bit.ly/1rXwmIB

Field Guide to Antique Buttons and Vintage Glass http://www.grandmothersbuttons.com/Images/Interior/resources/gran_fieldguide_web2011.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Out On A Limb: The Photography of Ronnie Goyette

ronnie_owl

 

Ronnie Goyette once again focuses her extraordinary eye on the many birds that call the Morro Bay Estuary and local environs their home.  From a large blue heron delicately landing on a tree branch, to the flickering reflections of an egret about to grab his dinner, Ms. Goyette’s patience, keen eye and mastery of her camera are evident in photographs that capture the stunning beauty of the exquisite, decisive moment.

Stepping Out, photo by Ronnie Goyette, 2013. 19 x 25

This is Ms. Goyette’s second one-woman show at the Seven Sisters Gallery and once again it will coincide with the Morro Bay Bird Festival, thereby giving bird-watching visitors a chance to see the talented work of this extraordinary new nature photographer.

“For me, the joy of photography lies in slowing down and seeing the small things.  In relaxing to watch a bird for more than a moment, personalities are revealed:  Snowy Egrets dance for joy, Grebes run across the very surface of the water, Elephant Seals battle to defend a harem.  With the light changing every minute, the photographer times the shot to reveal the beauty of a fleeting moment.  It’s a supremely rewarding experience, one that I am pleased to share with you.”

Ms. Goyette’s work has appeared in the SWAP (Elfin Forest), PG&E and the Elkhorn Slough National Estuary calendars and has been used by the Sierra Club in various venues.  In addition, her photograph of cows, “Sunrise on the Ranch,” placed 1st at the California Mid-State Fair, and “Mr. Adorable,” an Island Fox portrait, is a Flickr Explore selection.

-written by Ann Calhoun

Yanna’s Mystical Animal Angels

ImageImage

Seven Sisters Gallery is honored to carry the work of California artist Yanna, well known to Renaissance Faire attendees for her beautifully unique porcelain “Animal Angels”.   ImageImage

This is the first time that she’s offered her enchanting porcelain bisque “Mermaid Animal” pins outside of Faire.  Available exclusively at the Seven Sisters Gallery in Marina Square on the Embarcadero in Morro Bay, California and online at sevensistersgalleryca.com.

Niki Lunn and The Colors of Morro Bay

Seven Sisters Gallery is excited to welcome our newest artist, contemporary painter Niki Lunn. I asked Niki to talk a little bit about her thoughts on creativity, and her life as an artist.

Personally, I think that creativity resides in all of us. Perhaps some more than others, but unfortunately with the current education system that has evolved over hundreds of years in Europe and now the United States it is apparent to me that most artists had to fight against the system to remain creative as it is often the tide to ʻeducateʼ it right out of us.

Sunset Morro Bay Acrylic on canvas 48"x36"

Sunset Morro Bay
Acrylic on canvas, 48″x36″

Sadly, many talented children have not been rewarded for their free thinking artistic leanings, but rather persuaded over the years to postpone the urge to just go and paint, or write, or dance in order to follow a ʻmore reasonableʼ money making career.

My education was started in Yorkshire, England where I was born and moved into the U.S. system later on in High School and University. It was typical in the way that most of my classes and teachers praised efforts in the basics of reading, writing and arithmetic equally in both countries. The pressure was always to ʻfit inʼ, make the grade and focus on a related career. My H.S. counselor told me after standardized tests that I was most likely to become a successful legal secretary. That was a shock for me and certainly not something I had any interest in, so I majored in a B.of Fine Art and Art History in college and of course minored in something ʻuseableʼ for later on-  marketing. After graduating I taught art for some years in the Michigan public system and later on in the Florida schools, always to find that at the end of every year I was in the principalʼs office hearing the words that funding had been cut and art and music were the first to go. But what I learned during this period of my life was important and I found myself going back to school to earn a M.S. in Psychology and Counseling. I wanted to help kids at a crucial stage in their educational development to really realize their dreams at an earlier stage than I did.

Fleet Returning 48"x24" Acrylic on canvas

Fleet Returning
Acrylic on canvas, 48″x24″

After another eight years in counseling I changed course again and did finally go into marketing and public relations. I was nearing the goal of incorporating artistic talents into an everyday job. Happily this led to creating my own company doing marketing for ʻadventure travelʼ companies. Suddenly everything changed and I was the one in control. I never worked in an office again and started traveling around the world doing what I loved- creative writing about adventurous, fun things to do in nature.

After meeting my husband, a private yacht captain, we traveled together throughout Europe and to many fascinating places that I would never have probably ventured to as a legal secretary! Throughout the last 24 years I have never lost my interest in art, if anything it was reaffirmed in every new location that I visited, seeing the art museums and their bounty of beautiful art collections as a perfect mirror to the culture that they represented.

Light has played an integral role in many of my pieces. It is true that the impressionists became my favorite genre of painting while I lived in France, it is easy to see why they painted the way that they did with that soft mellow light playing amid their landscapes. It influenced my work as well.  When in harsher light such as the Greek islands my colours became stronger and painting style more bold.

When I am not painting, I tend to be walking in nature since it is there that I find inspiration. Somehow it speaks to me in a universal language unhindered by borders or words and offers an unlimited range of colours and meanings to the eye of the beholder. As far as my own colour palette I like to use a rich combination of bright hues, trying to catch on canvas a glimpse of what nature offers us as a visual feast of happiness everyday.

niki_favorite

Sunset
Acrylic on canvas, 48″x24″

My favorite painting is always the next one that I am going to paint. I typically work at home, taking the ideas from memory and photos I may have taken to remind me of shapes and movements in nature that I liked. Although I did take a B.F.A in university, I can honestly say that it has been through trial and error and perseverance that has found me at where I am now. I am still learning and think that I always will be.

I know that if you let the spirit move you then your inner talent will emerge, whether be it in dance, creative writing or producing a painting.

Niki will be showing her work at Seven Sisters Gallery in Morro Bay, beginning with her opening reception at Art Walk Friday, June 14 from 5:00-8:00. Stop by to meet the artist, see her work and enjoy music and refreshments.